Vitamin extravaganza fall soup ~

Soup fixings, October 26, 2013

Soup fixings, October 26, 2013

Radicchio, swiss chard, tomatoes, cranberry beans, carrots: looks like the makings for a yummy soup!IMG_20131026_181624

It’s at times like this that collecting food-scraps for composting feels especially satisfying: all those bulky bean pods going to some good use! Also included in this photo are the onion and garlic I forgot to get into the previous one. (Speaking of things in pods, one we know of is about, about, about … to come out … yet in his own good fulness of time, it would seem!)

Soup's on! October 26, 2013

Soup’s on! October 26, 2013

Cooked! and served with a sprinkling of grated cheese … as it happened there was only room for the radicchio, which I’d forgotten I had when I bought the chard!

Gold star worthy!

Manhattan BOE, October

Manhattan BOE, October

Having only realized that I’ll be out of town on election day (returning late that night, actually) after the deadline for requesting an absentee ballot, I found my way today to the Manhattan Borough Board of Elections office (handily located just a short walk away) to fill out an absentee ballot in person. Voting: done! All systems go for the reason for my being out of town to transpire!!

Mum cushions!

Row of chrysanthemum cushions, October 24, 2013

Row of chrysanthemum cushions, October 24, 2013

Colorful planting on the Fifth Avenue side of the New York Public Library — look for more NYPL posts since weekly or every-other-weekly work days there have become a new aspired-to routine!

Food truck #24

Franco-Vietnamese food truck, October 23, 2013

Franco-Vietnamese food truck, October 23, 2013

A reminder–in the colors of the French flag–of France’s centuries-long connection with Vietnam (read about it here). I thought this food truck was so much fun that I took a picture of the (very fun) other side too:

Franco-Vietnamese food truck, side 2, October 23, 2013

Franco-Vietnamese food truck, side 2, October 23, 2013

Paris is most definitely always a good idea!

The cow, the grindstone, and the fleeing flu (Original Boomerang for October 20, 1918)

Original Boomerang, October 20, 1918

Original Boomerang, October 20, 1918

This issue of the original Boomerang begins with a couple really interesting signs of the times. In fact, the first is a reference to time: the Boomerang Man reports that Aunt Helen and Uncle Wesley turned up at twenty-eight-thirteen (the Enos’ address on Cottage Grove) at 5:00 in the evening “new time” … new time? Could this be a reference to daylight saving time? It seems that it might! The United States first adopted daylight saving time on March 31 of 1918!! And it would probably still have been in effect on October 20th 1918 (as it is on October 20th 2013). (Read about the history of daylight saving time in the US here.) So that’s one sign of the times; the other is the really curious expression that follows: Fred reports that when Aunt Helen and Uncle Wesley appeared at 5:00 “new time” a few evenings previously,  “we all knew the cow would eat the grind stone.” Say what? Googling this phrase turns up several examples from the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth Midwest, where it seems to mean basically that seeing that X has just happened (e.g. Aunt Helen and Uncle Wesley turning up), then we know that something that a person would sensibly think would never ever happen (like a cow eating a grindstone) is about to happen nevertheless. Here’s an example from the Waterloo Daily Currier of February 23, 1901, where it appears in a story about an existing park is saved from becoming the site of a court house:

Waterloo Daily Courier, February 23, 1901

Waterloo Daily Courier, February 23, 1901

Between the “new time” and the cow and the grindstone, that was quite a lot of historical interest all in one sentence (now we have to wonder about why Helen’s and Wesley’s appearance was so unexpected!) — but there’re still more interesting bits of news in this issue: more on the flu quarantine, for instance (says Fred, “the flu has nearly flown” — hurray!), news about Ruth becoming a “ledger girl”for the Iowa Telephone Company (and making $45 a month!!), and a report on poor Beth having a mysterious illness, which thankfully is not the flu . . . though if it’s jaundice, as Dr. Field field suspects, it could still be serious!? We’ll see if there’s a sequel …