Life is a bowl full of cherries, or . . .

Life is a bowl full of cherries, they say, or, in Mary Engelbrett’s whimsical spoonerism and image, a chair full of bowlies (image from the cover of her book by the same title):

Life is just a chair full of bowlies . . .

. . . until its a sofa full of bookies!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If the painters are coming to paint your apartment the next day, though, life may just possibly become just a sofa full of bookies!

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Congratulations to the new UW student and . . . St. Patty’s Day Flash Mob

Congratulations to Alexa on her imminent highschool graduation (June 10) AND on her acceptance to the University of Washington, where she’s planning to major in Math — hurray, hurray! We’re all so proud of her! Here’re a couple pictures from her facebook gallery of senior pictures (ever the “water girl”!):

Alexa, Shilshole Sunset

Alexa, spring showers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In other news, there was a fun Saint Patrick’s Day “flash mob” in Sydney Australia (where we can see that it’s high summer there!):

Norwegian Gem, NYU Green

The training count-down to the big Five-Boro bike ride is on and I went for a ride up the west side bike path yesterday and got these photos of the still leaf-less trees here in New York and of the Norwegian Gem just going down the Hudson on its way to the Caribbean.

And the day before that, I toured NYU’s new ($125 million, 11 years in the planning) CoGen plant, where “steam punk” meets the Houston Space Center (lots of touch screens, supplying data from every single part of the plant!). The natural-gas-powered plant supplies electricity to 22 NYU buildings–AND sells a surplus amount back to the grid–along with supplying hot water for taps and cold water for cooling to the same buildings. There’s a website about the plant here and a nifty .pdf poster of its innards hereNYU-CoGen-plant-How-it-works.

[Note: This post was begun on March 7 and only posted now on March 17th, when my enthusiasm about NYU’s CoGen plant seems somewhat provincial in the light of the unfolding disaster in Japan . . . ): ]